Centre Teachers

Our classes in Buddhism and meditation are in the most part delivered by ordained members of the Triratna Buddhist Order.

The Order consists of men and women who are themselves living a life of meditation and Buddhist practice, and have been for many years.


Jnanadhara

Jnanadhara Picture

Jnanadhara is originally from New Zealand and first encountered Buddhism through books while in his mid-teens. After finishing a diploma in music he got involved with the Triratna Centre in Wellington. His desire to get deepen his involvement led him to the UK.

He was ordained into the Triratna Buddhist Order in 2003. Soon after he moved to Dublin and since then has been teaching classes at the DBC. Jnanadhara is current chair of the charity that runs the DBC.

Read more... Read less...

'Right from the start I was deeply attracted to the Buddhist teachings that I read about. Their clarity, and the invitational and exploratory manner with which they were expressed, helped me make sense of the baffling contradictions I felt in my life. They also gave me a practice I could actually do.

'Buddhism continues to be important to me because the perspectives and practices that it gives provide a way to access an experience that I can only describe as ‘newness’ - a sense that I'm living in a new world with a new mind.

'For me, practising and communicating Buddhism is a way of responding to the world with all its problems, and a way of bringing forth and realising my potential and the potential of others. I’m particularly inspired by being part of a harmonious community of men and women, who share this vision and that I look up to and can learn from.’

 

Maitrikaya

Maitrikaya Picture

Maitrikaya first learnt to meditate over 30 years ago and first came along to the Dublin Buddhist Centre in 2004 to reconnect with his meditation practice and to explore something that was both Western and Buddhist.

He is a regular teacher in the centre and also organises many of our retreats. He was ordained into the Triratna Buddhist Order in 2011.

Read more... Read less...

'I first learned to meditate in my late twenties, over thirty years ago now, and also had a sitting meditation practice as part of my martial T'ai Chi practice.

'From my mid-teens I thought of myself as a scientific materialist but at the same time I had a yearning for something beyond mere materialism and meditation seemed to offer that. I first came along to the Dublin Centre in 2004 in a bid to reconnect with my meditation practice but also, having tried one or two traditional Buddhist groups, I wanted to explore something that was both Buddhist and Western.

'Buddhism was initially meditation to me, and this is still an important part of it for me. Meditation, to borrow a phrase, has become an expression of who I am. It keeps me in touch with myself and my relationship with the world and those I share it with. From personal relationships to the issue of the effects of climate change, my Buddhist practice informs all aspects of my life.

'Buddhism, particularly as it is expressed by Sangharakshita, has changed my life, made me a much happier individual and less blown about by the winds of life. The Buddha's teaching on conditionality is probably why I am a Buddhist. When I first heard it I thought here are the answers to quite a few questions I have had. It continues to inspire my practice as I discover its depths!'

 

Pavara

Pavara Picture

Pavara first learnt to meditate in his late teens and came into contact with Triratna in 1994. Yoga practice has been a key aspect of his Buddhist practice since that time and he continues to teach and train within the Iyengar system of practice.

Pavara was ordained in Spain in 1999 whilst working in a Buddhist run team-based right-livelihood business in the UK. He is the main yoga teacher in the Centre.

Read more... Read less...

'I first came to Buddhism through my reading of the Beat Generation writers and poets, which was part of a search for deeper meaning and understanding of the mystery of existence.

'Meditation to me is a gateway into stillness and stillness is the beginning of Beauty. Buddhism is a map to freedom and the deepest communication of understanding and meaning that I have heard.

'The teaching of friendship as a path to wisdom particularly inspires me.'

 

Prajnagita

Prajnagita Picture

Prajnagita first encountered Buddhism and meditation through the DBC in 1995. She has been engaged with the Centre in various capacities since then and currently works on the Centre Team.

A large part of her work is looking after the needs of women who have made a definite commitment to the Buddhist Path. Prajnagita was ordained on a two month retreat in Tuscany, Italy in 2002.

Read more... Read less...

'I was always following some sort of spiritual path but when I finally realised that I wasn’t aware of myself, and needed to become aware of myself, I decided to learn meditation to help me with that. I learnt about Buddhism soon after I started to meditate and felt that it resonated with my own experience on many different levels, not least as a way of understanding myself and the world around me.

'Buddhism for me is a path of meaning, a path of transformation and ultimately a path of freedom. It is the means through which I move beyond suffering and the causes of suffering, into aware, creative, expansive, and loving states of being.

'I am particularly inspired by the possibility of fulfilling my potential as a human being and becoming wise and compassionate like the Buddha.'

 
 

Vajrashura

Vajrashura Picture

Vajrashura started practicing yoga and learnt to meditate while in university doing a Masters in High Performance Computing. He firstly did these through university societies, and then in the Dublin Buddhist Centre.

He has worked as part of the Centre Team since 2002 and takes particular responsibility for looking after the needs of men who have made a definite commitment to the Buddhist Path. He is also the manager of the Centre. In 2007 he joined the Triratna Buddhist Order.

Read more... Read less...

'On my first meditation retreat I realised that, if I was to be happy in life, my life needed to have a spiritual dimension, that this spiritual dimension would be Buddhism, and that this would be a lifetime path of ever deepening understanding.

'This initial vision has still stood true, and it has led by to Ordination and wanting to lead a life dedicated to Buddhism.

'For me, meditation and Buddhism are a way of living a truly human life, one based upon connection, empathy, wisdom and love. And a way of making the world a better place.'


About

Centre Teachers

Our classes in Buddhism and meditation are in the most part delivered by ordained members of the Triratna Buddhist Order.

The Order consists of men and women who are themselves living a life of meditation and Buddhist practice, and have been for many years.


Jnanadhara

Jnanadhara Picture

Jnanadhara is originally from New Zealand and first encountered Buddhism through books while in his mid-teens. After finishing a diploma in music he got involved with the Triratna Centre in Wellington. His desire to get deepen his involvement led him to the UK.

He was ordained into the Triratna Buddhist Order in 2003. Soon after he moved to Dublin and since then has been teaching classes at the DBC. Jnanadhara is current chair of the charity that runs the DBC.

Read more... Read less...

'Right from the start I was deeply attracted to the Buddhist teachings that I read about. Their clarity, and the invitational and exploratory manner with which they were expressed, helped me make sense of the baffling contradictions I felt in my life. They also gave me a practice I could actually do.

'Buddhism continues to be important to me because the perspectives and practices that it gives provide a way to access an experience that I can only describe as ‘newness’ - a sense that I'm living in a new world with a new mind.

'For me, practising and communicating Buddhism is a way of responding to the world with all its problems, and a way of bringing forth and realising my potential and the potential of others. I’m particularly inspired by being part of a harmonious community of men and women, who share this vision and that I look up to and can learn from.’

 

Maitrikaya

Maitrikaya Picture

Maitrikaya first learnt to meditate over 30 years ago and first came along to the Dublin Buddhist Centre in 2004 to reconnect with his meditation practice and to explore something that was both Western and Buddhist.

He is a regular teacher in the centre and also organises many of our retreats. He was ordained into the Triratna Buddhist Order in 2011.

Read more... Read less...

'I first learned to meditate in my late twenties, over thirty years ago now, and also had a sitting meditation practice as part of my martial T'ai Chi practice.

'From my mid-teens I thought of myself as a scientific materialist but at the same time I had a yearning for something beyond mere materialism and meditation seemed to offer that. I first came along to the Dublin Centre in 2004 in a bid to reconnect with my meditation practice but also, having tried one or two traditional Buddhist groups, I wanted to explore something that was both Buddhist and Western.

'Buddhism was initially meditation to me, and this is still an important part of it for me. Meditation, to borrow a phrase, has become an expression of who I am. It keeps me in touch with myself and my relationship with the world and those I share it with. From personal relationships to the issue of the effects of climate change, my Buddhist practice informs all aspects of my life.

'Buddhism, particularly as it is expressed by Sangharakshita, has changed my life, made me a much happier individual and less blown about by the winds of life. The Buddha's teaching on conditionality is probably why I am a Buddhist. When I first heard it I thought here are the answers to quite a few questions I have had. It continues to inspire my practice as I discover its depths!'

 

Pavara

Pavara Picture

Pavara first learnt to meditate in his late teens and came into contact with Triratna in 1994. Yoga practice has been a key aspect of his Buddhist practice since that time and he continues to teach and train within the Iyengar system of practice.

Pavara was ordained in Spain in 1999 whilst working in a Buddhist run team-based right-livelihood business in the UK. He is the main yoga teacher in the Centre.

Read more... Read less...

'I first came to Buddhism through my reading of the Beat Generation writers and poets, which was part of a search for deeper meaning and understanding of the mystery of existence.

'Meditation to me is a gateway into stillness and stillness is the beginning of Beauty. Buddhism is a map to freedom and the deepest communication of understanding and meaning that I have heard.

'The teaching of friendship as a path to wisdom particularly inspires me.'

 

Prajnagita

Prajnagita Picture

Prajnagita first encountered Buddhism and meditation through the DBC in 1995. She has been engaged with the Centre in various capacities since then and currently works on the Centre Team.

A large part of her work is looking after the needs of women who have made a definite commitment to the Buddhist Path. Prajnagita was ordained on a two month retreat in Tuscany, Italy in 2002.

Read more... Read less...

'I was always following some sort of spiritual path but when I finally realised that I wasn’t aware of myself, and needed to become aware of myself, I decided to learn meditation to help me with that. I learnt about Buddhism soon after I started to meditate and felt that it resonated with my own experience on many different levels, not least as a way of understanding myself and the world around me.

'Buddhism for me is a path of meaning, a path of transformation and ultimately a path of freedom. It is the means through which I move beyond suffering and the causes of suffering, into aware, creative, expansive, and loving states of being.

'I am particularly inspired by the possibility of fulfilling my potential as a human being and becoming wise and compassionate like the Buddha.'

 
 

Vajrashura

Vajrashura Picture

Vajrashura started practicing yoga and learnt to meditate while in university doing a Masters in High Performance Computing. He firstly did these through university societies, and then in the Dublin Buddhist Centre.

He has worked as part of the Centre Team since 2002 and takes particular responsibility for looking after the needs of men who have made a definite commitment to the Buddhist Path. He is also the manager of the Centre. In 2007 he joined the Triratna Buddhist Order.

Read more... Read less...

'On my first meditation retreat I realised that, if I was to be happy in life, my life needed to have a spiritual dimension, that this spiritual dimension would be Buddhism, and that this would be a lifetime path of ever deepening understanding.

'This initial vision has still stood true, and it has led by to Ordination and wanting to lead a life dedicated to Buddhism.

'For me, meditation and Buddhism are a way of living a truly human life, one based upon connection, empathy, wisdom and love. And a way of making the world a better place.'